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May 8 is edging closer

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May 8 is edging ever-closer at seemingly warp-speed, and troubling, new information has come to my attention.

The above date is, of course, another very important election day on which we decide who will be our new state senator.

It’s time, past time, for us to have a state senator who will step forward and truly represent the people of Senatorial District 22 with a bold conservatism that these times call for.

One of the newly discussed possible options for these troubling times, concerned what-to-do with some of the tough-to-swallow edicts being passed down to Texas (and to we the people) from on high, Washington, DC, that is, is an oldie; nullification.

In 1810, for example, it would not have been unusual for a state, upon receiving some directive from Washington, to look it over and respond, "No thank you!"

Well, why not?

After all, the states had come together and had established the national government to be run according to the guidelines pronounced in the new national constitution.

If a state decided Washington had stepped outside those guidelines, their "no thank you" was referred to as nullification.

For the most part, that would have been that, as the states and the people were the ones who had set up the national government in the first place. It was their creation…and since when does the creation rule the creator?

The new constitution had given Washington the authority for 17 or 18 items, that’s all!

When a dispute arose over whether Washington had the authority to ram something down the states’ throat, so to speak, the state, through its own offices (and the people) could nullify that item if it chose to do so and deemed it unconstitutional.

However, through the years and initially due to literal (civil) war being waged on the states desiring to secede and continue with a strong states rights concept of government, the nullification model ceased to be employed by any of the states. It just kind of died an unnatural death.

Until recently, that is.

With the rejuvenation of the Tea Party idea, borne out of our troubled times, the recall of a number of original American ideas have, in a sense been reawakened and reborn, nullification being but one of them.

Heaven knows America must eventually put her foot down and say no to all the socialistic leanings being slowly (and not-so-slowly) poured out upon us.

Either that…or cease to be who we thought we were.

All of this is really quite important, though our years of sitting on a stove in a pan of cool brook water, as the frog, ever-so-slowly being warmed to cooking temperature, has dulled our senses to the dangers surrounding us…and we have yet to realize we must jump from the pan while we can, or become some frog-eater’s supper.

So, information has come to my attention regarding all three SD22 state senatorial candidates (David Sibley, Brian Birdwell, and Darren Yancy) answering questions at a Corsicana Republican Club meeting, regarding the idea of nullification.

Sibley (endorsed by Congressman Barton, I understand) was not in favor of nullification.

Birdwell (written of in last week’s Simply Speaking) was reported to have said it would be a "disaster" to pursue nullification. (A disaster for whom, I wonder?)

Yancy was in favor of nullification, even writing a resolution, turned in at the Ellis County Republican County Convention this year to that effect.

There was also a question regarding the interpretation of the 14th Amendment which, as currently ruled, enables babies born in this country of illegal aliens to automatically become US citizens, due to their being born here.

Neither Sibley nor Birdwell would go there, regarding this question, however, Yancy said a challenge to the current interpretation is warranted.

Desperate times call for desperate measures, so our new state senator should be up to the tasks lying before us.

Thought you might like to know, so keep your ears on.

May Yahweh (God) bless.


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