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Are we in trouble?

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Something does not add up here! The normal response to emergencies and disasters is the town, city, county and state (National Guard).

Then the governor has the authority to ask for federal help. An army brigade as first line by passing all others does not make sense.

The brigades’ job is to provide security. In case of biological or chemical attacks, their job would be to establish a perimeter around the area away from contamination to control who comes in and who leaves so contamination does not spread or kill more people.

The medical (Army) company only has the capability to support the brigade (not a disaster). I know, I was a medical company commander and traveled with a brigade.

There are units the size of brigades trained for decontamination and not security.

The U.S. Army has already conducted four exercises this year. They dropped in the middle of the night on a town (no one, including the mayor, knew they were coming) armed, and took control of the town, scaring residents and the communities did not like it.

Unless I am missing something or did the following happen while I was  asleep:

  The United States is under the control of the federal government (by passing the governor, county, city and town). We are now federalized.

  The treasurer federalized the banks. Used $250 billion not voted on by the Senate or Congress and not even a part of the bailout bill.

  The War Powers Act was intended to use: a specific mission for a limited time, to level the playing field, knowing American citizens would lose rights and privacy.

The War Powers Act is now being used on the mission of terrorism with no end. Some of our rights under the Constitution could be gone.

Homeland Security just got caught monitoring all American communications in Iraq, to include our soldiers and civilians. Are we in trouble?

Buck Werner

Duncanville

 

Editor’s note: Werner, whose wife serves on the Duncanville school board, submitted this article from the Army Times to back up his editorial.

Army Taps Brigade for Homeland Defense

For the first time, the U.S. Army has designated an active-duty unit stationed at home to serve as a federal response force for natural or manmade emergencies and disasters, including terrorist attacks. The 3rd Infantry Division’s 1st Brigade Combat Team, which has spent 35 of the past 60 months in Iraq, began its new assignment on Oct. 1.

It is not the first time an active-duty unit has been tapped to help at home, the Army Times reports. "In August 2005, for example, when Hurricane Katrina unleashed hell in Mississippi and Louisiana, several active-duty units were pulled from various posts and mobilized to those areas.

"But this new mission marks the first time an active unit has been given a dedicated assignment to NorthCom, a joint command established in 2002 to provide command and control for federal homeland defense efforts."

Soldiers with the 1st Brigade Combat Team will be stationed and trained at Fort Stewart, Ga. When its 12-month mission is completed, another yet unnamed active-duty brigade is expected to take over the mission, which will be a permanent one, according to the Army Times. The unit could be called upon to help with civil unrest and crowd control, or to deal with the chaos following an earthquake or a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear attack.

"I can’t think of a more noble mission than this," said Col. Roger Cloutier, the brigade’s commander. "We’ve been all over the world during this time of conflict, but now our mission is to take care of citizens at home."


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Nelson Propane

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